Author Topic: Greetings from the brood.  (Read 18626 times)

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Offline Lisbon Virgo

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #75 on: April 16, 2015, 06:32:08 PM »
You're only just now seeing that? :D
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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #75 on: April 16, 2015, 06:32:08 PM »

Offline MeepSire

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #76 on: April 17, 2015, 04:57:51 AM »
*summons a rubber welcome mat and sits in it*
Indeed.
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Offline GreenEyedMonster

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #77 on: April 17, 2015, 07:33:07 AM »
You can't stop the music!  *BLAM!*  Nobody can stop the music!  *BLAM!*
The myriad eyes of the brood look at you, a sea of synaptic permutations of a single brain and will spanning over twenty years of growth.  We have worked toward this goal for a long, long time, and we are ready for you.  Ask your question.

Offline SleepingBeau

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #78 on: May 27, 2015, 05:07:43 PM »
A late late late late reply, and my apologies for the reticence.

Your approach and methods are commendable. I'm glad you appreciate the veracity of information as well as the depth and mystery of our own minds. I agree, tendencies for interest and disinterest as you've described aren't uncommon and are justifiably acceptable. And again, it's quite commendable not just that you see your limitations but also that you see your aspirations as separate (and above) your normal limitations. Self improvement is a journey; not easy, and fraught with annoyance and frustration, but a necessity for personal growth so we can take on bigger tasks, accomplish bigger things, and be better people. (I think I just abused my quota for comma's...)

I too appreciate the need for credible sources. I'm sorry to say, though, that my path through life has made an impossibility of keeping track of where all my knowledge comes from. As an unfortunate anti-social habit, I seek out new things with only personal use in mind and I trust in my brains ability to recall what's important when it's important. Because of this and that, it has been more efficient to concentrate my efforts on understanding, remembering, and knowing how to better find what I'm looking for. To remedy this I used to keep a database of information sources and resources and lists of all kinds that I could easily update on the fly, but an unfortunate incident lost me ~3 years of work and I haven't had the heart to start over, yet.

I can describe a little about my experience in accumulating knowledge of the mind, however;

I had ever been interested in psychology and philosophy, but it wasn't until high school where I found similarly curious minded folks where I could begin exploring them in earnest. Even if what I put into discussions was wrong, doing so allowed me (and others) to pick apart my thoughts and find interest in the minutae I hadn't even realized was there. Proposing thought experiments and all the many 'what-if's that some people abhor got me into habitually venturing out from the current constructs in my mind to explore possibilities of what could be, based on what I know.

I acknowledge and do mostly agree with the "credible sources only" approach, but over time I've been led to believe that it isn't conducive to curiosity and imagination. I won't turn my face from the truth. Academic texts aren't the most attractive of leisurely pursuits, especially the more 'raw' research and report paper which hold accurate information from which to understand the world compared to 'interpreted' texts. And so, my method has generally been to construct and explore, and when possible, verify and curate with credible sources. I've had very little official instruction in navigating the world of academia so it isn't often that I find immediate and direct answers to the questions I want to ask. In the end, though, my method makes me hungry to increase what I verifiably do know, which I'm sure everyone can agree is the biggest obstacle in delving into what many think of as the overly technical world of STEM.

Anyway, a few years after high school I stumbled on a book written by one of the forerunners of neuroscience.  http://www.amazon.com/In-Search-Memory-Emergence-Science/dp/0393329372 It turned out to be a great introduction to the hard science of the brain, and a much needed shift away from psychology and into something more tangible and related to the rest of science. It had gotten me far enough into neuroscience where I could read raw science papers on the subject and understand a good deal of what I read. More than that, however, it opened up a whole new a branch of questions to ask and terms to look up. I subsequently held a subscription to the Nature: Neuroscience journal for about a year, keeping abreast of current research. Sadly I hit a speedbump in my life at that point and haven't had the ability to jump back into it yet.

These days I explore abstract theoretical mathematical/computational constructs based on what I had learned. I'm not working on actual scientific theory or anything (maybe one day), but casually working on my ideas gives me good motivation and an interesting direction to keep furthering my understanding of the brain.

Anyway, some interesting concepts to look into: the Connectome http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connectome ; Artificial Intelligence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence ; and Behavioral Science https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_science

Why those two subjects that have nothing to do with the actual brain organ itself? Well sometimes it's a good idea to investigate things that are similar to what you want to study so you can learn what it might be like, and also what it is not. If you haven't yet cultured in yourself the ability to find a point of interest within a dearth of as yet uncomprehensible information, a good approach to take is to just latch on some small piece of it that you have some understanding of or find interesting, and grow your base of knowledge from there. And if that fails, find something arbitrarily interesting, even just some weird or absurdly technical word, and puzzle it out like a mini-game.

I fear that I've failed to establish a socially relatable step between what you've written and allowed myself to run away with my thoughts too much. Unfortunately I only have so much lucid and organized thought to pass out *sips the last of his coffee* and I must limit my consumption of elucide motivation for health reasons. I'll have a proper followup question for you next time :3
And the cackling coyote said to the wolf, "Then what will be left to eat but the fat off your lies and my gamey pointless riddles?"

Offline Risha Kalsyhan

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #79 on: May 27, 2015, 08:35:37 PM »
A late late late late reply, and my apologies for the reticence.

Your approach and methods are commendable. I'm glad you appreciate the veracity of information as well as the depth and mystery of our own minds. I agree, tendencies for interest and disinterest as you've described aren't uncommon and are justifiably acceptable. And again, it's quite commendable not just that you see your limitations but also that you see your aspirations as separate (and above) your normal limitations. Self improvement is a journey; not easy, and fraught with annoyance and frustration, but a necessity for personal growth so we can take on bigger tasks, accomplish bigger things, and be better people. (I think I just abused my quota for comma's...)

I too appreciate the need for credible sources. I'm sorry to say, though, that my path through life has made an impossibility of keeping track of where all my knowledge comes from. As an unfortunate anti-social habit, I seek out new things with only personal use in mind and I trust in my brains ability to recall what's important when it's important. Because of this and that, it has been more efficient to concentrate my efforts on understanding, remembering, and knowing how to better find what I'm looking for. To remedy this I used to keep a database of information sources and resources and lists of all kinds that I could easily update on the fly, but an unfortunate incident lost me ~3 years of work and I haven't had the heart to start over, yet.

I can describe a little about my experience in accumulating knowledge of the mind, however;

I had ever been interested in psychology and philosophy, but it wasn't until high school where I found similarly curious minded folks where I could begin exploring them in earnest. Even if what I put into discussions was wrong, doing so allowed me (and others) to pick apart my thoughts and find interest in the minutae I hadn't even realized was there. Proposing thought experiments and all the many 'what-if's that some people abhor got me into habitually venturing out from the current constructs in my mind to explore possibilities of what could be, based on what I know.

I acknowledge and do mostly agree with the "credible sources only" approach, but over time I've been led to believe that it isn't conducive to curiosity and imagination. I won't turn my face from the truth. Academic texts aren't the most attractive of leisurely pursuits, especially the more 'raw' research and report paper which hold accurate information from which to understand the world compared to 'interpreted' texts. And so, my method has generally been to construct and explore, and when possible, verify and curate with credible sources. I've had very little official instruction in navigating the world of academia so it isn't often that I find immediate and direct answers to the questions I want to ask. In the end, though, my method makes me hungry to increase what I verifiably do know, which I'm sure everyone can agree is the biggest obstacle in delving into what many think of as the overly technical world of STEM.

Anyway, a few years after high school I stumbled on a book written by one of the forerunners of neuroscience.  http://www.amazon.com/In-Search-Memory-Emergence-Science/dp/0393329372 It turned out to be a great introduction to the hard science of the brain, and a much needed shift away from psychology and into something more tangible and related to the rest of science. It had gotten me far enough into neuroscience where I could read raw science papers on the subject and understand a good deal of what I read. More than that, however, it opened up a whole new a branch of questions to ask and terms to look up. I subsequently held a subscription to the Nature: Neuroscience journal for about a year, keeping abreast of current research. Sadly I hit a speedbump in my life at that point and haven't had the ability to jump back into it yet.

These days I explore abstract theoretical mathematical/computational constructs based on what I had learned. I'm not working on actual scientific theory or anything (maybe one day), but casually working on my ideas gives me good motivation and an interesting direction to keep furthering my understanding of the brain.

Anyway, some interesting concepts to look into: the Connectome http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connectome ; Artificial Intelligence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence ; and Behavioral Science https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_science

Why those two subjects that have nothing to do with the actual brain organ itself? Well sometimes it's a good idea to investigate things that are similar to what you want to study so you can learn what it might be like, and also what it is not. If you haven't yet cultured in yourself the ability to find a point of interest within a dearth of as yet uncomprehensible information, a good approach to take is to just latch on some small piece of it that you have some understanding of or find interesting, and grow your base of knowledge from there. And if that fails, find something arbitrarily interesting, even just some weird or absurdly technical word, and puzzle it out like a mini-game.

I fear that I've failed to establish a socially relatable step between what you've written and allowed myself to run away with my thoughts too much. Unfortunately I only have so much lucid and organized thought to pass out *sips the last of his coffee* and I must limit my consumption of elucide motivation for health reasons. I'll have a proper followup question for you next time :3

Yes, we are going to fight back. But not here, not now, not in the Colonies. Not even in this star system. Let the word go forth to every man, woman and child who survived this holocaust. Tell them to set sail at once in every assorted vehicle that will carry them.

Battlestar Galactica (1978)

Offline GreenEyedMonster

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« Reply #80 on: June 09, 2015, 07:01:24 AM »
Beau, I read your post and found it enlightening.  Unfortunately, I can't reply with as much of a response as I'd like, for two reasons: one, it's two in the morning here and I should really get to bed now, and two, I'm going to Air Force BMT tomorrow (well, later today) and can't sleep in or reply then.  So, in lieu, goodbye for now and expect a full reply in a few months time.  Ta!
The myriad eyes of the brood look at you, a sea of synaptic permutations of a single brain and will spanning over twenty years of growth.  We have worked toward this goal for a long, long time, and we are ready for you.  Ask your question.

Offline SleepingBeau

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Re: Greetings from the brood.
« Reply #81 on: June 10, 2015, 01:53:59 AM »
No worries, and thank you for the compliment of your response.

Of course. Reply at your leisure :3. I'll likely be around. Enjoy.
And the cackling coyote said to the wolf, "Then what will be left to eat but the fat off your lies and my gamey pointless riddles?"